Archive for the ‘ How To’s… ’ Category

Fantastic Preppers Site

April 17, 2014 4:46 pm | No Comments

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The best way to get started on your food storage is to sign up for their FREE BabyStep Checklists. Their bi-weekly emails walk you through planning, buying, and using your food storage.

If you’re wondering why people store food, read their Why Food Storage Series. There are more reasons than you’d expect!

Growing and Heating in a Greenhouse

December 14, 2011 3:26 pm | No Comments

I live in Northern Utah so our days are really short this time of year. I just started seed again a few weeks ago, and I simulate longer warmer days for these new seedings from germination till about 3 weeks.
To do this, I put a 4′ flourescent light almost touching the flat. This flat has a clear plastic dome over it, to keep the heat in and let the light in.
Flourescent lighting gives off a little heat, but I heat my greenhouse by using roofing cables that are used for melting snow on the edge of the roof.
I run them back and forth under the beds and put them on a timer to come on about 5pm and go off about 8am. They are waterproof and use very little energy. They could be hooked up to a solar panel.
If I am expecting it to be below 10 degrees, I will put a little radiator type heater in the greenhouse, on a timer to come on when the sun goes down.
If it is going to be below zero and windy, I will cover the plants with a layer of bubblewrap or 6 mil plastic as another barrier. I haven’t had to do this very often though. You could just use the second layer if you don’t have a really cold climate, without additional heat. Greenhouses and plants,collect heat in the day, and use it in the night to stay warm.
The North wall of my greenhouse has insulation foam to help keep the heat in also.
This has worked really well for the past few years.

100% Homegrown

December 12, 2011 11:18 am | No Comments

In the pursuit of providing a self sufficient lifestyle in these troubled times, we have so many options that we don’t think we are capable of, but are really quite easy if you take one step at a time.

I always thought gardening started on my last freeze date in May, but I have come to learn that if I prepare a little in the fall, and even through the winter, we can eat out of our garden, cold frames and small greenhouse year round providing enough nutritious, organically grown food for three or more families depending on the time of year.

One thing I do is till and prepare a couple of rows for planting in the fall, then I cover the bed with grass clippings and leave it till spring.

The beauty of these beds is that if we have a really wet spring, where it is too muddy to get in and walk or dig, I can still hand trowel a little hole and put in lettuce and spinach starts and peas. All of which love cool wet weather.

I have greens in a month, even when there is still snow coming every once in a while.

My name is Doug Copp. I am the Rescue Chief and Disaster Manager of the American Rescue Team International (ARTI), the world’s most experienced rescue team. The information in this article will save lives in an earthquake.

I have crawled inside 875 collapsed buildings, worked with rescue teams from 60 countries, founded rescue teams in several countries, and I am a member of many rescue teams from many countries. I was the United Nations expert in Disaster Mitigation for two years, and have worked at every major disaster in the world since 1985, except for simultaneous disasters.

The first building I ever crawled inside of was a school in Mexico City during the 1985 earthquake.

Every child was under its desk. Every child was crushed to the thickness of their bones. They could have survived by lying down next to their desks in the aisles. It was obscene — unnecessary.
Simply stated, when buildings collapse, the weight of the ceilings falling upon the objects or furniture inside crushes these objects, leaving a space or void next to them – NOT under them.

This space is what I call the ‘triangle of life’. The larger the object, the stronger, the less it will compact. The less the object compacts, the larger the void, the greater the probability that the person who is using this void for safety will not be injured. The next time you watch collapsed buildings, on television, count the ‘triangles’ you see formed. They are everywhere. It is the most common shape, you will see, in a collapsed building
TIPS FOR EARTHQUAKE SAFETY

1) Most everyone who simply ‘ducks and covers’ when building collapse are crushed to death. People who get under objects, like desks or cars, are crushed.

2) Cats, dogs and babies often naturally curl up in the fetal position. You should too in an earthquake. It is a natural safety/survival instinct. You can survive in a smaller void. Get next to an object, next to a sofa, next to a bed, next to a large bulky object that will compress slightly but leave a void next to it.

3) Wooden buildings are the safest type of construction to be in during an earthquake. Wood is flexible and moves with the force of the earthquake. If the wooden building does collapse, large survival voids are created. Also, the wooden building has less concentrated, crushing weight. Brick buildings will break into individual bricks. Bricks will cause many injuries but less squashed bodies than concrete slabs.

4) If you are in bed during the night and an earthquake occurs, simply roll off the bed. A safe void will exist around the bed. Hotels can achieve a much greater survival rate in earthquakes, simply by posting a sign on the back of the door of every room telling occupants to lie down on the floor, next to the bottom of the bed during an earthquake.

5) If an earthquake happens and you cannot easily escape by getting out the door or window, then lie down and curl up in the fetal position next to a sofa, or large chair.

6) Most everyone who gets under a doorway when buildings collapse is killed. How? If you stand under a doorway and the doorjamb falls forward or backward you will be crushed by the ceiling above. If the door jam falls sideways you will be cut in half by the doorway. In either case, you will be killed!

7) Never go to the stairs. The stairs have a different ‘moment of frequency’ (they swing separately from the main part of the building). The stairs and remainder of the building continuously bump into each other until structural failure of the stairs takes place. The people who get on stairs before they fail are chopped up by the stair treads – horribly mutilated. Even if the building doesn’t collapse, stay away from the stairs. The stairs are a likely part of the building to be damaged. Even if the stairs are not collapsed by the earthquake, they may collapse later when overloaded by fleeing people. They should always be checked for safety, even when the rest of the building is not damaged.

Get near the outer walls of buildings or outside of them if possible – It is much better to be near the outside of the building rather than the interior. The farther inside you are from the outside perimeter of the building the greater the probability that your escape route will be blocked.

9) People inside of their vehicles are crushed when the road above falls in an earthquake and crushes their vehicles; which is exactly what happened with the slabs between the decks of the Nimitz Freeway. The victims of the San Francisco earthquake all stayed inside of their vehicles. They were all killed. They could have easily survived by getting out and sitting or lying next to their vehicles. Everyone killed would have survived if they had been able to get out of their cars and sit or lie next to them. All the crushed cars had voids 3 feet high next to them, except for the cars that had columns fall directly across them.

10) I discovered, while crawling inside of collapsed newspaper offices and other offices with a lot of paper, that paper does not compact. Large voids are found surrounding stacks of paper.

Make Your Own Laundry Soap

May 28, 2010 7:46 am | No Comments

This can save you a lot of money over the long run.

VIDEO: http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/player/popup/?rn=289004&cl=19060710&src=finance&ch=633459

ARTICLE: http://finance.yahoo.com/family-home/article/109349/do-it-yourself-laund

Click here for an excellent article on how to save money and resources for more productive uses.  The Survival Blog is a good information resource.

Update

April 25, 2010 11:21 am | No Comments

  • 1st Aid handouts are being added from this months focus
  • How to build a Hoop House has been added to the “How To” section

This is why…

We had a ‘Ready Ant’ call in from New Mexico today asking about the group buy on the water barrels.  Unfortunately, this is only a local group buy, but anyone can set up their own group buy in their own area just like we did.

HOW?

Call around to the various stores in your area that might offer the barrels to the public.  Strike a deal with them using the information on this site as your leverage on prices.  If you pick them up (rather than have them shipped) you should be able to work the same deal where ever you live.  It just takes a leader to gather in the wares for the many.

Good luck and bless you for your willingness to help others.  You’re a good “Ready Ant!”  Welcome to Ant Hill #6!

How To Survive An Earthquake

Here is a rebuttal pertaining to the validity of Mr. Copp’s information and credentials sent to us by one of our Ready Ants (who is pretty sharp!) You read both and decide for yourself.  Informed is forewarned.   Click here to see what Snopes says.  It’s interesting…

My name is Doug Copp. I am the Rescue Chief and Disaster Manager of the American Rescue Team International (ARTI), the world’s most experienced rescue team. The information in this article will save lives in an earthquake.

I have crawled inside 875 collapsed buildings…

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