Archive for the ‘ Health & Nutrition ’ Category

Growing and Heating in a Greenhouse

December 14, 2011 3:26 pm | No Comments

I live in Northern Utah so our days are really short this time of year. I just started seed again a few weeks ago, and I simulate longer warmer days for these new seedings from germination till about 3 weeks.
To do this, I put a 4′ flourescent light almost touching the flat. This flat has a clear plastic dome over it, to keep the heat in and let the light in.
Flourescent lighting gives off a little heat, but I heat my greenhouse by using roofing cables that are used for melting snow on the edge of the roof.
I run them back and forth under the beds and put them on a timer to come on about 5pm and go off about 8am. They are waterproof and use very little energy. They could be hooked up to a solar panel.
If I am expecting it to be below 10 degrees, I will put a little radiator type heater in the greenhouse, on a timer to come on when the sun goes down.
If it is going to be below zero and windy, I will cover the plants with a layer of bubblewrap or 6 mil plastic as another barrier. I haven’t had to do this very often though. You could just use the second layer if you don’t have a really cold climate, without additional heat. Greenhouses and plants,collect heat in the day, and use it in the night to stay warm.
The North wall of my greenhouse has insulation foam to help keep the heat in also.
This has worked really well for the past few years.

100% Homegrown

December 12, 2011 11:18 am | No Comments

In the pursuit of providing a self sufficient lifestyle in these troubled times, we have so many options that we don’t think we are capable of, but are really quite easy if you take one step at a time.

I always thought gardening started on my last freeze date in May, but I have come to learn that if I prepare a little in the fall, and even through the winter, we can eat out of our garden, cold frames and small greenhouse year round providing enough nutritious, organically grown food for three or more families depending on the time of year.

One thing I do is till and prepare a couple of rows for planting in the fall, then I cover the bed with grass clippings and leave it till spring.

The beauty of these beds is that if we have a really wet spring, where it is too muddy to get in and walk or dig, I can still hand trowel a little hole and put in lettuce and spinach starts and peas. All of which love cool wet weather.

I have greens in a month, even when there is still snow coming every once in a while.

Eat your fruits and vegetables! The health benefits of a diet rich in fruits and vegetables outweigh the risks of pesticide exposure. Use EWG’s Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides to reduce your exposures as much as possible, but eating conventionally-grown produce is far better than not eating fruits and vegetables at all. The Shopper’s Guide to Pesticide in Produce will help you determine which fruits and vegetables have the most pesticide residues and are the most important to buy organic. You can lower your pesticide intake substantially by avoiding the 12 most contaminated fruits and vegetables and eating the least contaminated produce.

Commodity crop corn used for animal feed and biofuels is almost all produced with genetically modified (GMO) seeds, as is some sweet corn sold for human consumption. Since GMO sweet corn is not labeled as such in US stores, EWG advises those who have concerns about GMOs to buy organic sweet corn.  See the good and bad list …

Freeze Dried Food Alert

March 5, 2011 3:21 pm | No Comments

There is a good website to look at for freeze dried meats, vegetables and fruit for good prices.  It is www.honeyvillegrain.com.   The more you buy the less the price.   Shipping is only 4.49 for the order.

Also, Emergency Essentials has a good sale on freeze dried salmon for 24.99.

Dr. Christopher’s Products

February 2, 2011 1:36 pm | No Comments

For the month of February Lifebalm.com is having their 45% off sale on Dr. Christopher products.  This month is a good time to stock up on your favorite and most used Dr. Christopher products.  I will send a link to their website.

Fighting Colds

December 22, 2010 1:20 pm | No Comments

A robust immune system is dependent on a number of lifestyle and environmental factors, but the most common factors are:

Optimized vitamin D levels – Research has confirmed that “catching” colds and flu may actually be a symptom of an underlying vitamin D deficiency. Less than optimal vitamin D levels will significantly impair your immune response and make you far more susceptible to contracting colds, influenza, and other respiratory infections.
In the largest and most nationally representative study of its kind to date, people with the lowest vitamin D levels reported having significantly more recent colds or cases of the flu — and the risk was even greater for those with chronic respiratory disorders like asthma.
I strongly believe you could avoid colds and influenza entirely by maintaining your vitamin D level in the optimal range. Vitamin D is an amazingly effective antimicrobial agent, producing 200 to 300 different antimicrobial peptides in your body that kill both bacteria and viruses.

Avoiding sugar and grains — If you feel yourself coming down with a cold or flu, this is NOT the time to eat sugar, grains, artificial sweeteners or processed foods. Sugar is particularly damaging to your immune system — which needs to be ramped up, not suppressed, in order to combat an emerging infection.

Getting proper rest — If you aren’t getting enough sleep, or enough restorative sleep, you’ll be at increased risk for a hostile viral takeover. Your immune system is also the most effective when you’re not sleep-deprived, so the more rested you are the quicker you’ll recover. You can find 33 secrets for a good night’s sleep here.

Effectively addressing emotional stressors — Emotional stressors can predispose you to an infection and make cold symptoms worse.

Finding ways to manage daily stress as well as your reactions to circumstances beyond your control will contribute to a strong and resilient immune system. My favorite tool for this is the Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT), a system that helps balance your body’s subtle energies and repair emotional “short-circuits.” EFT may even help you overcome cold symptoms.

Regular exercise – Regular exercise is a crucial strategy for increasing your resistance to illness. There is evidence that regular, moderate exercise can reduce your risk for respiratory illness by boosting your immune system.

In fact, one study found that people who exercised regularly (five or more days a week) cut their risk of having a cold by close to 50 percent. Exercise likely cuts your risk of colds so significantly because it triggers a rise in immune system cells that can attack any potential invaders.

  1. Things to do IF you get a cold:

The inner bark of the Slippery Elm, when mixed with water, it becomes a slick gel. This gel is rich with antioxidants and coats your throat, stomach lining and intestines.

Herbal Tea

Making a tea from the herb Echinacea may help fight the common cold. Goldenseal tea helps treat respiratory tract infections, eye infections and even yeast infections. Hot ginger or elderberry tea can help soothe a sore throat.

Honey

If you have a sore throat, try gargling with a honey mixture.

Nasal Saline Rinse

A natural nasal saline irrigates your nose and helps clear thick mucus and relieve pressure from your sinuses.

Steam

Steam can moisturize your nasal passages and will help the pressure from your sinuses.

White and Cider Vinegar

Wearing a pair of cotton socks soaked in white vinegar is an old, natural remedy that is still used today to reduce a fever.

White Willow

White willow is a natural anti-inflammatory and fever reducing remedy.

Chicken Noodle Soup

Chicken noodle soup has been medically proven to help cure a cold or fever. It is most effective if the soup is made with actual chicken bones in the broth.

Garlic

Here’s one folk remedy to cure a cough or chest cold — chop raw pieces of garlic and mix it with olive oil. Let the mixture sit for a half hour, and then rub the mixture on the bottoms of your feet and cover with socks. The garlic will be absorbed by your skin.

Ginseng

Ginseng can help cure a cold or the flu, as well as prevent future colds if taken as a daily supplement.

Freeze Dried Food Finds and More

December 14, 2010 2:46 pm | No Comments

For those looking to get more food storage small or large, I have found a few good sources.  Costco is a great source for small and large quantities.  They also have groups of  freeze dried vegetablesfruits, wheats or cheeses in the smaller quanities, etc. at great prices with shipping included.  They start as low as $39.99.

Also, I have found Emergency Essentials to have good group discounts on different freeze dried products every month.  For December you can get a #10 can of freeze dried raspberries for $20.00 with a minimum of 6 or freeze dried beef teriyaki with rice #10 can for $22.00 with a minimum of 6.  Then you can get free shipping on the rest of you order with the purchase of the group specials.  I have found a great freeze dried cheese group #2 that has 6- #10 cans of cheddar, colby, and monterey for 179.99.  That is less then even costco at $199.99.  You can order a catalog and get on their email list for the group specials ever month.

Another source I found that is wonderful for so many items, even the ones I hadn’t thought about, is a place called Walton Feed in Idaho.  It may be a little drive but it would be well worth it if you have a large order.  They do ship also and you just go into the link at the top of their website that says SHOP to find the products you want.  They have sprouts ,  dried products, seeds, etc. at a great price.

Then you could stop by Gossner in Logan, Utah for their ready to drink milk (stored normal like the rest of your food storage on the shelf) and we have had ours for years.   It is nice to just open the milk and drink instead of the dry milk.  It tastes good and our kids love the small flavored containers you can buy.  I think our favorite is cookies and cream.  We miss not having these places close anymore now that we live back east.

Happy planning,

Michelle

The little stickers on loose fruits and vegetables have valuable information on them! According to a letter from ‘a scientist knowledgeable in the field of genetically modified organisms (GMOs)’ in the October 2003 issue of Gourmet magazine: “a..useful tip to the consumer [would be] a primer on how to read the little stickers on loose fruits and vegetables. Besides providing the store’s cash registers and computers with product identification and price information, these stickers can tell you a lot about the food you are buying. A label with four digits indicates conventionally grown food. Labels with five digits starting with an 8 indicate that the food is genetically modified. Labels with 5 digits starting with a 9 indicate that the food is organically grown.”

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